Maple Bacon Brown Sugar Scones


Well, this is one scone recipe that Hubby talked up to everyone at work before I sent them in. So much so that I sincerely hoped it lived up to expectations when they arrived–I was actually a bit nervous. I fully intended to jump this recipe to the top of the blogging queue, but the two and a half week early arrival of my first born set me back a bit in terms of being ready to become a mother. Now that my son is one week old, and my mother has been at our house cooking us dinner and making things easier on us as new parents, I actually have a chance to finish writing up this recipe. In the near future, I will probably be taking a short hiatus, not knowing exactly when I’ll have a chance to post new recipes–even if I get a chance to make them.

Without further ado, on to the recipe that I think many people have been waiting for. Despite my not really caring for bacon and not understanding the bacon-maple craze, I wanted to try my hand at this concoction, and even thought maybe I would try an entire scone this time when I make them…

When they have cooled for several minutes, drizzle with the maple icing and try to allow the icing to set before stuffing them in your face!
These were some of my most popular scones to date!

…but I didn’t. I just cannot get into this maple-bacon thing. But, full disclosure, I’ve never really cared for bacon, and so pairing it with maple just doesn’t excite me. I decided to attempt a maple-bacon recipe though, because I know how popular it is, and how many people, including my hubby would love it. So, I tried my hand at it, and I think, based on the number of marriage proposals I received, it was pretty successful.

Yield: 16 medium-small scones
Baking time: 10 minutes
Cooling time: 10-25 minutes

Ingredients:

Scones:
3 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
6 tbsp butter
1 package (1 lb) crumbled bacon
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup real maple syrup

Maple Icing:
3-4 tbsp real maple syrup
1/2 tsp real maple extract (or to taste)
1 cup confectioner’s sugar, sifted
1 tsp vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste

Instructions:

1) Cook the bacon. I like to freeze the bacon before I chop it, then remove and let thaw for maybe 10 or 15 minutes, then cut the bacon into 1/2-inch strips. I don’t wait for it to thaw the rest of the way before I cook it, just throwing the half-thawed bacon bits into a hot skillet. Cook on the stovetop until it’s as crispy as desired (I like mine extra crispy). This step can take some time.

2) When your bacon is done and cooling off the stove, preheat the oven to 450ºF. Whisk the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt together in a large bowl.

3) Add the cold, diced butter and work in with a pastry blender. A few pea-sized chunks in this recipe are okay.

4) Add the cooled, chopped bacon to the dry ingredients and toss with a wooden spoon to mix.

5) In a measuring cup or small bowl, whisk together the maple syrup and 1/2 cup of the buttermilk.

6) Add the maple syrup-buttermilk mixture to the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon. Add additional buttermilk as needed–just enough to bring the dough together so that a few floury bits are left in the bottom. (When you turn out the dough and give it a knead or two, these floury bits will be worked in.)

7) Turn out the dough and any floury bits that remain onto a lightly floured countertop. Give one or two kneads to bring together. Try not to over-knead, just one or two turns will do. Flatten into a log about seven inches wide and about 1/2-inch in height, about a foot long. Cut the dough into sixteen triangles with a sharp knife.

8) Place the scones about two inches apart on a parchment-lined backing sheet and brush with any remaining buttermilk.

9) Bake at 450ºF for about 10 minutes, or until lightly golden on top and firm to the touch.

10) While the scones are baking, sift your confectioner’s sugar and combine it with the vanilla, maple extract, and maple syrup. Start with two tablespoons maple syrup and add more to reach the desired consistency. (I used 3 tablespoons, but would probably use less next time, as I prefer a harder icing when set.)

11) When the scones are done baking, allow to cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes. Then transfer to a wire cooling rack with parchment paper underneath it to catch any icing runoff. Drizzle the scones with the icing. Allow the icing to set before enjoying.

The Process:

Mostly frozen bacon dices quite nicely. Just toss the frozen strips onto a hot skillet and cook to your desired crispiness!
Mostly frozen bacon dices quite nicely. Just toss the frozen strips onto a hot skillet and cook to your desired crispiness!
Using a big pan or a cast-iron skillet makes the bacon cooking go faster.
Using a big pan or a cast-iron skillet makes the bacon cooking go faster.
Beautiful bacon! I like my bacon (when it eat it at all) crispy, on the burnt side. (I didn't burn it for this recipe though.)
Beautiful bacon! I like my bacon (when it eat it at all) crispy, on the burnt side. (I didn’t burn it for this recipe though.)
Let the bacon cool after you've cooked it, and lay in a paper-towel lined bowl or on a paper-towel lined plate to catch some of the grease.
Let the bacon cool after you’ve cooked it, and lay in a paper-towel lined bowl or on a paper-towel lined plate to catch some of the grease.
Measure out your ingredients.
Measure out your ingredients.
Combine your dry ingredients and whisk to mix.
Combine your dry ingredients and whisk to mix.
Add the butter and work it into the flour with a pastry blender. Some pea-sized chunks are okay with this recipe.
Add the butter and work it into the flour with a pastry blender. Some pea-sized chunks are okay with this recipe.
No, that's not bacon grease on the bottom--that's maple syrup! Combine the maple syrup and some buttermilk and whisk to mix. Set aside.
No, that’s not bacon grease on the bottom–that’s maple syrup! Combine the maple syrup and some buttermilk and whisk to mix. Set aside.
Add the bacon to the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon.
Add the bacon to the dry ingredients and mix with a wooden spoon.
Add the maple syrup mixture to the dry ingredients and stir with a wooden spoon to mix.
Add the maple syrup mixture to the dry ingredients and stir with a wooden spoon to mix.
Add additional half & half as needed to bring dough almost together with just a few floury bits left at the bottom.
Add additional half & half as needed to bring dough almost together with just a few floury bits left at the bottom.
Perfect!
Perfect!
Pat out into a log and cut into 16 triangles!
Pat out into a log and cut into 16 triangles!
As I froze mine before baking, I put them all on a parchment-lined sheet and brushed with buttermilk before sticking them in the freezer to bake later.
As I froze mine before baking, I put them all on a parchment-lined sheet and brushed with buttermilk before sticking them in the freezer to bake later.
Going directly to the oven, just place the scones about two inches apart on a parchment-lined baking sheet and brush with buttermilk.
Going directly to the oven, just place the scones about two inches apart on a parchment-lined baking sheet and brush with buttermilk.
Pure beauty, no? Bake them until they look golden all over. And keep your mitts off until you put the icing on top.
Pure beauty, no? Bake them until they look golden all over. And keep your mitts off until you put the icing on top.
When they have cooled for several minutes, drizzle with the maple icing and try to allow the icing to set before stuffing them in your face!
When they have cooled for several minutes, drizzle with the maple icing and try to allow the icing to set before stuffing them in your face!

Results:

I’ve never been a huge fan of bacon. Every once in awhile, it’s okay, but it’s not my go-to breakfast meat, nor snack food, I don’t care for bacon on my burgers or sandwiches…so why did I make these scones again? Oh, right, everyone else seems to like love bacon.

That said, I think these were a success. They are just crunchy enough to be tasty, not too buttery, not too sweet, not too salty…I think they actually turned out pretty well. And if you’re a fan of bacon, well, they may just be awesome. But no guarantees…after all, I’m not a bacon fan.

From the bacon fan: (Hubby) “These might be the best you’ve ever made.” Although, I have to admit, I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve heard that phrase uttered since I started sending scones in with him to work. Usually though, it doesn’t come directly from his mouth, so there is something there in hearing them from his lips.

From several of his co-workers: “When you die, I’ll marry your wife.” Ha! I laughed a lot as the marriage proposals trickled in throughout the day. Besides being oddly flattered, I think they ultimately reflected upon this recipe. It was a success.

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6 Comments Add yours

  1. I DO like bacon and these look wonderful to me! 🙂

    1. Thanks! I admit they were well received, so I’m sure it’s simply my bias against this particular flavor combination. 😉 I hope, if you get the chance to try them, that you enjoy them, too!

  2. Debra Nippert says:

    Well, before I try this could you clarify something? In the list of ingredients you say to use buttermilk but in the directions you say half and half. Which is it? I’m a big fan of buttermilk in any scone so that’s probably what I’d go with.

  3. Debra Nippert says:

    Sorry, clarification. You do say buttermilk in the directions. It’s in The Process that you say half and half. At least when you show the picture that’s not bacon grease. It says to mix the maple syrup and half and half. But later in that section you say to brush the tops with buttermilk. So I’m thinking you did indeed mean buttermilk. That’s what I’m going with. Might try these for dinner tonight to go with a German pancake I’m making, filled with sautéed apples, Oktoberfest sausage and topped with cheddar cheese. These should be perfect with.

    1. Thanks for catching that! I’ll correct it when I get a chance. I did indeed mean buttermilk!

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